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The Gujarati edition of the Memoirs of Aga Khan: The voice of the translator and his reflections on the 48th Ismaili Imam

Introduced by ABDULMALIK MERCHANT
(Publisher/Editor Barakah, Simerg and Simergphotos; all .com)

memoirs of aga khan jackets of western editions

Jackets of the Western translations of “The Memoirs of Aga Khan.” Top Row (l to r): French, Finnish and German; Centre Row: Italian, Spanish and Norwegian; Bottom Row: English UK and USA.

The autobiography of the 48th Ismaili Imam, Mawlana Sultan Mahomed Shah, His Highness the Aga Khan III, was first published in London in 1954 under the title “The Memoirs of Aga Khan: World Enough and Time.” While the English versions of the British and American editions were circulated widely in the English-speaking world, a remarkable fact is that the 48th Imam’s autobiography was translated into six European languages as well Gujarati, Sindhi and Urdu.

How accurate and well done are these translations? What was each translator’s view of the project he or she undertook? What processes did the translator apply for the translation? Was the primary focus of  the translator on the task at hand or did he try to identify with the subject of the book or its original author?

A fascinating piece by the Gujarati translator of the Memoirs, Jyotindra Dave, answers all these questions. The article appeared in an old Ismaili magazine that I uncovered in my parent’s archives. Apparently  Mr. Dave, as my little bit of work on the internet revealed,  was acknowledged as one of the most outstanding humorists of Gujarati literature, and he had also worked as an oriental translator with the Bombay Government. He was also scholar of Sanskrit and English literature. The Ismailia Association for India which was commissioned to do the Gujarati translation certainly found the right person in Mr. Jyotindra Dave for the job. I am told that Mr. Dave’s skill and brilliance of the Gujarati language are reflected in this translation of The Memoirs. But as is so often the case, his dedicated work was hardly acknowledged by the Ismailia Association for India. His name does not appear on the book cover page or on the inside title page and, then, only a passing reference is made to his spirited effort in an editorial note contributed by the President of the Ismailia Association for India.

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HIS HIGHNESS THE AGA KHAN AND THE CHALLENGES OF TRANSLATING HIS AUTOBIOGRAPHY

The difficulty was not one of the English language. By and large, the language of the book is simple. His Highness the Aga Khan had no great love for high sounding words or unfamiliar expressions. His style was mature and simple and his language fluent, serious and easily intelligible to a reader. The reason for the difficulty in translation was quite different…..

Gujarati jacket of the Memoirs of Aga Khan

The jacket of the Gujarati edition of “The Memoirs of Aga Khan,” translated by the late Jyotindra Dave, who was held in high esteem in the Indian literary circles. Photo: Late Zul Khoja Family Collection, Ottawa.

By JYOTINDRA H. DAVE
(1901 – 1980)

On behalf of the Ismailia Association, Mr. Sultan, accompanied by the late Shri Mastafakir [another contemporary humorist, senior to Jyotindra Dave – ed.], came to see me with the English edition of His Highness the Aga Khan’s Memoirs. I was requested to suggest names of persons who might be able to translate the book into Gujarati within a short time. I recommended a few persons, but the representative was not enthusiastic about my feedback, and ultimately insisted that I should undertake that task. I told him that I could not decide until I saw the book. I looked quickly through the pages of the copy that he provided me, and at first glance it appeared a very simple undertaking. My visitor then insisted I do the translation of the book, with the help of two gentlemen from the Ismailia Association.

I translated the first chapter of the book quite easily and I thought to myself that I was set to complete the whole book in a short time. But the difficulty started when I came to the second chapter of the book dealing with the principles of Islam. As I proceeded further, I was convinced that the task I had undertaken was going to be much more difficult than I had anticipated earlier.

The difficulty was not one of the English language. By and large, the language of the book is simple. His Highness the Aga Khan had no great love for high sounding words or unfamiliar expressions. His style was mature and simple and his language fluent, serious and easily intelligible to a reader. The reason for the difficulty in translation was quite different. His composition strewn with apt adjectives and having parenthetic sentences within the body of main sentences reminded us of Victorian prose. The adjectives he has used are so accurate and apt that their exact equivalents in Gujarati are often hard to find. And it is not very easy to arrange parenthetic clauses in Gujarati construction in the proper places, in a way that would preserve not only the original sense but the original stress as well.

However, the much greater difficulty was of a different nature altogether. This was the multicoloured personality of His Highness the Aga Khan and numerous facets covered by the book. The subjects His Highness talks about in his book range from the essence of the religious spirit of Islam to the Derbys; one then passes from highest realm of serious thoughts to the intricacies of politics, and from there on to the plains of races and thence to the palatial theatres. Along the route you find men and women reputed in these fields all over the world, and you have to wait for their acquaintance.

It would not be surprising therefore for a person who embarks on such a long and arduous journey of translating to feel fatigued. Only one who is initiated in these subjects can get on with the task with interest.

Even if a translator cultivates an interest and proceeds with the work, he has to strain his brain to the utmost to find the equivalents of technical terms of that subject in his own language.

No authentic person had even written on these subjects in our language. The translator such as myself, therefore, has to search out for these unexplored field terms, and specially the technical terms, which are intelligible and yet convey the original connotation.

jyotindra_dave-_oriental_translator

A rare and unique photo of members of the Oriental Translator’s Office supplied to Simerg by Mr Urvish Kothari who is conducting research on Mr. Jyotindra Dave, translator of  “The Memoirs of Aga Khan” into Gujarati. Mr. Dave is seated third from right. The photo also bears his signature at the bottom right, above his printed name. Photo Credit: Urvish Kothari. Copyright.

We all know the Aga Khan as the chief of a large denomination of Islam. He himself has claimed that his work in that connection, as their Imam, forms the most important part of his life. But he has made very little mention of that work in his Memoirs. As the leader of a religious sect, his purpose is not restricted merely to the spiritual uplift of his followers. He has made all possible efforts to promote their educational, economic and social progress. His followers are spread far and wide in many countries of the world and he has journeyed all over the globe to look after their welfare.

Normally the chief of a religious sect can hardly see beyond the limits of his own sect. He and his followers take those who believe in another faith for heretics. They emphatically propound that there is no place for these heretics in Heaven….But the religious views of  His Highness the Aga Khan was not restricted. It was very liberal….For example, he writes in his Memoirs: “….I further pray that all who truly and sincerely believe in God, be they Christian, Jew, Budhist or Brahmin, who strive to do good and avoid evil, who are gentle and kind, will be joined in Heaven and be granted final pardon of peace.”

But unlike other religious heads his mission of life is not confined to his community alone. The part that be played in world politics of the past generation is well known to the students of history. Lovers of horse racing still remember his horses and the races they won. As the owner of horses he was not content with putting them in races or himself being a winner. He was equally interested in selection and breeding of the best horses and their training.

This book is in many ways different from other autobiographical works of this type. On the first page of the book the Aga Khan has inscribed this maxim, “World Enough and Time.” The earth for him has really been wide, and his journey into the realms of his interest and work are wide. It has been said in the Mahabharat, “Have no doubts whether a king is the maker of time or the time is the maker of the king. Certainly the king is the maker of the time.”

This then means that the time is as good or bad as the king. Making a timely alteration, we can now say that instead of the king it is politics that is the maker of the time. In politics, which is thus the maker of the time, the Aga Khan played a prominent part and became not only a witness to the history but became its component part. He has given an account of all this in this book. Giving the raison d’etre of this book, he himself says:

“Since I have witnessed this rapid and all developing process of change in every domain of human interest and experience – the technical and mechanical revolution of our time, man’s developing mastery of natural forces, the recognition of the importance of the subconscious. the vast increase in longevity, the rise of new moral standards and the corresponding profound changes in outlook, and great political changes undreamed of in my youth – I hope in these coming chapters to give some picture of each epoch as it unfolded before the eyes and the mind and heart of one who was usually an onlooker but sometimes actively a participant.”

This picture of a whole epoch – this picture of various changes in so many spheres of life at that time – has been depicted by him in a way that fills the reader’s eyes and mind, but at the same time a faint yet distinct and distinguishable picture of his own personality is also revealed incidentally.

Normally the chief of a religious sect can hardly see beyond the limits of his own sect. He and his followers take those who believe in another faith for heretics. They emphatically propound that there is no place for these heretics in Heaven. There is no dearth of Muslims who believe that there is no place in Heaven for a kafir howsoever pious; of Hindus who say that if a yavan pollutes even with his mouth in this world, there is no place for him in Heaven: and of Christians who declare that however noble a life you lead the gates of Heaven will forever remain closed to you until you accept Jesus Christ. But the religious views of His Highness the Aga Khan was not restricted. It was very liberal. For example, he writes in his Memoirs:

“….I further pray that all who truly and sincerely believe in God, be they Christian, Jew, Budhist or Brahmin, who strive to do good and avoid evil, who are gentle and kind, will be joined in Heaven and be granted final pardon of peace.”

Fanaticism was alien to His Highness Aga Khan’s nature. The maulavi who came to teach him Islam in his childhood was a fanatic, and he was disgusted to hear what the maulavi said. He writes:

“….Perhaps it was this early experience which for the rest of my life have given me certain prejudice against professional men of religion – be they mullahs or maulavis, curates, vicars or bishops.”

Somerset Maugham, the writer of the Preface to the book, has rightly said that His Highness the Aga Khan was a generous hearted man, and for him to say anything bad about others was contrary to his nature.

In The Memoirs, His Highness the Aga Khan has given brief outlines of many people who came in contact with him. About all of them he has unequivocally said whatever he felt about them.

Yet, while drawing the outlines of those with whom he had differences of opinion he has never allowed any bitterness to creep in. He has also exposed the shortcomings that be found. But, generally, he has tried to show their merits and he has done all this with the minimum of words, and with the help of one or two appropriate adjectives or bringing to light some special quality hidden in the nature of the person concerned, with the dexterity of an artist who creates a picture with a few bold strokes of his brush.

That he possessed a lofty religious spirit and a philosophic mind is revealed when he provides the sum-total of human life. He writes:

“Life in the ultimate analysis has taught me one enduring lesson. The subject should always disappear in the object. In our ordinary affections one for another, in our daily work with hand or brain, most of us discover soon enough that any lasting satisfaction, any contentment that we can achieve, is the result of forgetting self, of merging subject with object in a harmony that is of body, mind and spirit. And in the highest realms of consciousness all who believe in a Higher Being are liberated from all the clogging and hampering bonds of the subjective self in prayer, in rapt meditation upon and in the face of the glorious radiance of eternity, in which all temporal and earthy consciousness is swallowed up and itself becomes the eternal.”

And he continues:

“Never in my long life – I may say with complete honesty – have I for an instant been bored. Every day has been so short, every hour so fleeting, every minute so filled with the life I love that time for me has fled on far too swift a wing.”

How many people can say this like His Highness the Aga Khan? And the life of those who can say this should undoubtedly be called successful.

Date posted: February 17, 2019.

Before departing this website, may we suggest that you visit Barakah’s Table of Contents for links to more than 140 pieces dedicated to Mawlana Hazar Imam and his family.

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This is a revised and abridged version of an earlier article that appeared on Barakah’s sister website, http://www.simerg.com.

Barakah welcomes your feedback. Please complete the LEAVE A REPLY form below or send your comment to simerg@aol.com. Your letter may be edited for length and brevity, and is subject to moderation.

Please join/like Barakah at http://www.facebook.com/1000fold and also follow us at http://twitter.com/simerg.

This website, Barakah, is a special project by http://www.Simerg.com and is dedicated to the textual and visual celebration of His Highness the Aga Khan.

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Photos of Mawlana Hazar Imam, His Highness the Aga Khan, from a rare Ismaili magazine

Introduced by ABDULMALIK MERCHANT
(Publisher/Editor Barakah, Simerg and Simergphotos; all .com)

During one of my recent visits to Vancouver, I was very pleased to personally meet with Mr. Ahamed Ismail, with whom I had been communicating via email for a number of years. He graciously treated me to a wonderful buffet lunch at an Indian restaurant close to the Ismaili Centre on Canada Way. He then deeply touched me when he presented me with his personal copy of a 1977-1978 Commemorative Issue celebrating sixty years of Ismaili education in Kenya, published by His Highness the Aga Khan Education Department for Kenya.

Parting with rare books and magazines or even lending them to others is something I would normally not do, and I also advise my friends not to lend their rare literature. Mr. Ismail, however, gifted me the magazine because he was confident I would treat it with care and that I would use some material from it for the benefit of readers of Barakah. I am now delighted to fulfill his wish, but first I want to introduce Ahamed Ismail to readers through a memorable  event that took place in his life in 1957 when he was a young student. His account originally appeared in Simerg a few years ago. Mr. Ismail wrote:

Mawlana Hazar Imam’s visit and the iconic teacher Karim Master

“I arrived in Dar es Salaam for further studies from the small town of Musoma in 1956. Karim Master was the head teacher of religious studies, and I soon came to know him.

“I found that he took a keen interest in every student. He expected us to learn our history well, and recite the Dua, Ginans and the Eid Namaz in the best possible manner.

“Though strict, he was extremely kind hearted and fair. He greatly helped and encouraged me to sing Ginans and learn their meanings.

“Within a short period after my arrival, he taught and prepared me to recite the Eid Namaz in Dar es Salaam’s Darkhana Jamatkhana in 1956.

Continue reading after photo

Aga Khan and Ahamed Ismail 1957 Dar es Salaam

Ahamed Ismail seen reciting Qur’anic verses with Mawlana Hazar Imam, His Highness the Aga Khan standing next to him during the opening of the Aga Khan Primary School in Dar es Salaam. Photo: Ahamed Ismail Family Collection.

“In late 1950’s, Mawlana Hazar Imam, as I recollect, visited Dar es Salaam twice. The first visit was for the ceremonial installation (or the Takhtnashini) as our 49th Imam in 1957, and the later visit was for numerous other events, including the opening of the newly built Aga Khan Primary School.

“In preparation for the opening of the school, Karim Master chose me to recite verses from the Holy Qur’an in the presence of our beloved Imam. Karim Master selected Sura Fateha and Sura Ikhlas. He would call me into his office every day for almost two weeks, and ensured that my recitation was perfect for the big day.

“On the day of the opening of the Aga Khan Primary School, I went straight from my class to the site in my secondary school uniform – I was then in Grade 10. The opening was attended by numerous dignitaries including the Education Administrator, (Vazir) Alnoor Kassum, and the Liwali (Governor) of Dar es Salaam.

“The recital went really well and at its conclusion I was glad to learn that someone had taken photos of Mawlana Hazar Imam with me.

“I give my humble shukrana to Mawlana Hazar Imam for this wonderful blessing. I owe this unique lifetime opportunity to one of the greatest and finest human beings I have known in my life – the iconic Karim Master who inspired my religious outlook and understanding.”

On a personal note, adding to Ismail’s reflection about Karim Master, the late teacher was a dear and beloved friend of my parents – my late dad Jehangir who passed away last May, and my mother Maleksultan. Karim Master taught at the Aga Khan Boys Secondary School while my parents taught at the Aga Khan Girls Secondary School. Teaching religious education with Karim Master at the Aga Khan Boys was the late Amirali Jinnah. 

Cover page and inside first page Commemorative Issue 1977-1978 medium

Cover and opening pages of the Commemorative Issue 1977-1978 Celebrating Sixty Years of Ismaili Education in Kenya, 254 pp, His Highness the Aga Khan Education Department for Kenya, Soft cover.

The commemorative special issue that Ahamed Ismail presented me is dedicated to our beloved 48th and 49th Imams and begins with the following words in its opening pages.

To Our Beloved Imams Mowlana Sultan Mohamed Shah His Highness the Aga Khan III and Mowlana Shah Karim al-Husayni His Highness the Aga Khan through whose benevolence and guidance has been realised all that we see reflected in the pages which follow.

The magazine was edited by Izzat Muneyb, who passed away suddenly a few years ago. I fondly remember Izzat for the wonderful pieces she wrote for this blog’s sister website Simerg. The 254 page glossy magazine that she edited is rich in articles and photos.

I offer my sincere thanks to Ahamed Ismail, without whose generosity this post would not have materialized.

Aga Khan with territorial education administrators Verji Kassum and Shariff

Mawlana Hazar Imam pictured in 1959 in Nairobi with Territorial Education Administrators Madatali A. Shariff (Kenya), Alnoor Kassum (Tanzania) and Jimmy R.K.S Verjee (Uganda). Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Mawlana Hazar Imam’s pleasure at 100% pass achievement of students

Message from Hazar Imam on successful Cmabridge results

Mawlana Hazar Imam’s letter to Madatali Shariff. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan with student Yasmin

Mawlana Hazar Imam with Yasmin Moloo at Akbarali Moloo’s residence. When Yasmin replied to a question from Mawlana Hazar Imam that she found maths difficult, he spent about fifty minutes explaining to her the problem she was having difficulty with. See next photo for facsimile of the original paper on which Mawlana Hazar Imam worked out the maths problem with Yasmin. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan with student Yasmin fascimile of math problem

A facsimile of the original paper on which Mawlana Hazar Imam worked out a maths problem with Yasmin Mollo (see previous photo). Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Prince Aly Khan 60th anniversary Aga Khan schools issue

Mawlana Hazar Imam’s father Prince Aly Khan (1911 – 1960) with Madatali Shariff during his visit to Kenya in 1957. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Prince Aly Khan and Rita Hayworth visiting a classroom

Prince Aly Khan (1911-1960) and Rita Hayworth (1918-1987), 2nd from right and mother of Princess Yasmin, visit the Aga Khan Boys School in 1951. Also in picture are Ramzanali Dossa, then Chairman of Mombasa Provincial Education Board and Headmaster N. J. Joseph. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan III Mawlana Sultan Mahomed Shah with Count

Mawlana Sultan Mahomed Shah with Count Salehmohamed Ladha and his family at Cannes when a decision was taken to form the Salehmohamed Ladha Trust. Numerous institutions such as the Aga Khan Nursery Schools in Nairobi, Dar es Salaam, Zanzibar and Kampala as well as the Machakos Library in Dar es Salaam fell under the patronage of the Trust. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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The Two Worlds

Mawlana Sultan Mahomed Shah Ag Khan III Platinum Jubilee Message

An excerpt from a message by Mawlana Sultan Mahomed Shah on the occasion of the presentation of the Platinum Fund in Cairo on February 28, 1955. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan Mawlana Hazr Imam with superintendent Mrs. Brennan

Mawlana Hazar Imam greets Mrs. A Brennan, who was in charge of the Aga Khan Nursery School in Mombasa from 1951-1961. Badrudin Kanji, then Chairman of Mombasa Provincial Education Board, and Amirali Rashid, partly hidden, look on. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan Mawlana Hazr Imam Count Nathoo and Mayor

Mawlana Hazar Imam with Ismaili statesman and administrator Ibrahim Esmail Nathoo, and Her Worship, the Mayoress of Nairobi, Mrs. Needham Clarke. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan Mawlana Hazr Imam opening of Platinum Jubilee Hospital Nairobi

Mawlana Hazar Imam at the opening of the Platinum Jubilee Hospital in Nairobi in September 1958. He made two points: “This hospital is intended for all communities and all races. This building must become a monument to the idea of racial partnership.” Seated on Hazar Imam’s right is the Mayor of Nairobi, Her Worship Needham Clarke and other distinguished guests. A few nurses are seen watching the proceedings from the first floor window. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan Mawlana Hazr Imam foundation ceremony swimming pool

Mawlana Hazar Imam lays the foundation stone on September 25, 1959 of the first ever swimming pool built in the Aga Khan schools in Kenya. Mawlana Hazar Imam stressed the importance of having swimming and other extra curricular activities in the school. The pool at the Aga Khan Primary School was opened by Sir Patrick Renison, the then Governor of Kenya on June 17, 1960. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Begum Salimah Aga Khan at deaf unit

Begum Salimah looking on as children at the Deaf Unit demonstrate the use of their group hearing aid to the instructions of Mrs. Hassanali during the Begum’s visit to the Aga Khan Primary School in 1972. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan Mawlana Hazr Imam opening og Aga Khan high school Nairobi

Mawlana Hazar Imam (garlanded) at the opening of the Aga Khan High School Nairobi on December 10, 1961. Kenya’s former President, Daniel arap Moi, who was then the Minister of Education is seen second from left. Also in photo, Jimmy Verjee, Administrator, Nairobi’s Mayor His Worship Harold Travis, Ameer Kassim-Lakha and school headmaster, Mr. Corkery. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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Aga Khan Mawlana Hazr Imam excerpt from speech

Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

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His Highness the Aga Khan III and His Highness the Aga Khan IV

His Highness the Aga Khan III, Mawlana Sultan Mahomed Shah (1877 – 1957, Imam from 1885 – 1957), and his successor, the 49th Imam, Mawlana Shah Karim al Hussaini, His Highness the Aga Khan IV. Photo: Commemorative Issue 1977-1978.

Date posted: February 16, 2019.

Before departing this website, may we suggest that you visit Barakah’s Table of Contents for links to more than 140 pieces dedicated to Mawlana Hazar Imam and his family.

________________

Barakah welcomes your feedback. Please complete the LEAVE A REPLY form below or send your comment to simerg@aol.com. Your letter may be edited for length and brevity, and is subject to moderation.

Please join/like Barakah at http://www.facebook.com/1000fold and also follow us at http://twitter.com/simerg.

This website, Barakah, is a special project by http://www.Simerg.com and is dedicated to the textual and visual celebration of His Highness the Aga Khan.

The seal of Aga Khan University and convocation regalia of His Highness the Aga Khan

 The Seal of Aga Khan University

Aga Khan University Seal

The Seal of the Aga Khan University

The Seal of Aga Khan University is a visual representation of the principles which underlie the founding of the University. The circular form of the Seal, with its different levels of imagery contained in concentric circles, has its visual roots in the rosettes of early Islamic periods. The circle also symbolises the world and reflects the international presence of the University.

At the centre of the Seal is a star, or sun. Light is a universal symbol for the enlightenment that education provides. The light emanating from the star is also symbolic of Nur (Divine Light). The star incorporates 49 rays to commemorate the University’s founding by His Highness the Aga Khan, the forty-ninth Imam of the Ismaili Muslims.

Aga Khan University Convocation

Mawlana Hazar Imam, His Highness the Aga Khan, attired in the Aga Khan University regalia during a convocation ceremony held in 2013 in East Africa on the 30th anniversary of the University’s founding. The seal of the University is seen at the front of the podium.

The outer ring circumscribes a Quranic ayat (verse) rendered in classic thuluth script and reads as follows:

“And hold fast, All together, by the rope
Which God (stretches out for you),
And be not divided among yourselves,
And remember with gratitude
God’s favour on you:
For ye were enemies
And He joined your hearts
In love, so that by His grace
Ye became brethren” — 3:103

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The Regalia (Jamiapoash) of His Highness the Aga Khan

aga-khan-in-regalia

The academic regalia of the Aga Khan University worn during its convocations in Pakistan and East Africa is called Jamiapoash.

Jamia is from the Arabic meaning ‘institution of higher learning’ and poash is from Persian meaning ‘apparel.’ The Jamiapoash comprises a Khila’at, meaning “robe of honour” in Arabic and a Sirpoash, meaning “headwear” in Persian, with a tassel on the right.

The Khila’at (robe of honour) for Mawlana Hazar Imam is distinguished by its very elaborate and intricate gold embroidery on the upper part of the robe both back and front, but is also unique for its white colour.

White and gold were the colours of the coat of arms of the Fatimids of Egypt, the Aga Khan’s ancestors who founded al-Azhar University in Cairo in 970 CE.

The Sirpoash (headwear) for the Chancellor is white in colour and richly gold-embroidered with a 5.5 cm band and a 2 cm secondary green band with a green and white tassel.

Aga Khan University Convocation-jacqueline-diad-award-of-excecellence-in-educations

His Highness the Aga Khan presenting an Award of Excellence to Jacqueline Dias during a convocation held in East Africa in 2013 on the occasion of the Aga Khan University’s 30th year of founding. His ancestor, the Fatimid Imam-Caliph Al-Muizz was the founder of the Al-Azhar University in Cairo, a thousand years ago. His Highness, as the Chancellor of the University, is seen in the academic regalia called Jamiapoash which comprises a Khila’at, meaning “robe of honour” in Arabic and a Sirpoash, meaning “headwear” in Persian, with a tassel on the right (see previous photo). The Aga Khan’s robe is distinguished by its very elaborate and intricate gold embroidery on the upper part of the robe both back and front, but is also unique for its white colour. The robes worn by graduands as well as the President, the Board of Trustees and the Faculty of the University are green but have their own lines, trims, specific decorations and distinct features running both across the robe and the headgear.

Date posted: February 9,  2019.

Before departing this website, may we suggest that you visit Barakah’s Table of Contents for links to more than 140 pieces dedicated to Mawlana Hazar Imam and his family.

________________

Barakah welcomes your feedback. Please complete the LEAVE A REPLY form below or send your comment to simerg@aol.com. Your letter may be edited for length and brevity, and is subject to moderation.

Please join/like Barakah at http://www.facebook.com/1000fold and also follow us at http://twitter.com/simerg.

This website, Barakah, is a special project by http://www.Simerg.com and is dedicated to the textual and visual celebration of His Highness the Aga Khan.

Historical Diamond Jubilee message from Imam Sultan Mahomed Shah to Ismaili youth: “The body is the temple of God for it carries the soul”

“you can do much by going about your business, shopping etc on foot and carrying yourselves straight. The times of prayer should not be forgotten if you can do go to Jamatkana, if not say your Tesbih wherever you be…” 

aga-khan-message-to-youths

Transcript of message below. The message appeared in the Diamond Jubilee Yearbook published in Dar es Salaam on 10th August 1946. See cover page image of the Souvenir at top of this post.

Transcript

(unedited)

“To My Spiritual children taking part in The Rally Blessings and Welcome – I am sorry my health does not permit me to be with you but I have followed your programme with great interest. Remember that according to our Ismailia Faith the body is the Temple of God for it carries the soul that receives Divine Light so great care of body its health and cleanliness are to guide you in later life care of your inside and outside cleanliness – mouth, eyes, ears and on first signs of infection to the dispensary. Later in life sports will become difficult for you but you can do much by going about your business, shopping etc on foot and carrying yourselves straight. The times of prayer should not be forgotten if you can do go to Jamatkana, if not say your Tesbih wherever you be. So keep clean soul in a clean body Blessings Aga Khan”

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his-highness-the-aga-khan-diamond-jubilee timeline

The Diamond Jubilee Souvenir issue included this timeline of Mawlana Sultan Mahomed Shah’s key years in public life upto the Diamond Jubilee.

Date posted: February 8, 2019.

Before departing this website, may we suggest that you visit Barakah’s Table of Contents for links to more than 140 pieces dedicated to Mawlana Hazar Imam and his family.

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Featured image at top:  The cover page of the 200 plus page Diamond Jubilee Souvenir Yearbook dated 10th August 1946. The souvenir was edited by the late Rai A. M. Sadaruddin who was the publicity officer of the Diamond Jubilee Celebrations.

Barakah welcomes your feedback. Please complete the LEAVE A REPLY form below or send your comment to simerg@aol.com. Your letter may be edited for length and brevity, and is subject to moderation.

Please join/like Barakah at http://www.facebook.com/1000fold and also follow us at http://twitter.com/simerg.

This website, Barakah, is a special project by http://www.Simerg.com and is dedicated to the textual and visual celebration of His Highness the Aga Khan.

3 Amazing photos from flickr of Mawlana Hazar Imam, His Highness the Aga Khan, at the Paris Peace Forum

Introduced by ABDULMALIK MERCHANT
(Publisher/Editor Barakah, Simerg and Simergphotos .com)

The Flickr page of the Paris Peace Forum contains some amazing portraits and images of world leaders who attended the forum from November 11-13, 2018. Here are some photos of Mawlana Hazar Imam that will be of interest to all our readers. Please click on the images to view them on Flickr in larger formats, upto 2048 x 2048.

by Stephane Sby BalmyA birdview of world leaders including Mawlana Hazar Imam (upper portion, second row, right) looking to the sky as pictures are taken to mark the historic event. Please click on photo to view superb enlargements on Flickr.

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by David Le FrancWorld leaders including Mawlana Hazar Imam, are looking to the sky as pictures are taken to mark this historic event. Please click on photo to view enlargement on Flickr.

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by Marion Dubier ClarckIn this photo by Marion Dubier Clarck, Mawlana Hazar Imam and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada are seen in a warm embrace at the Paris Peace Forum. Please click on photo to view superb enlargements on Flickr.

Date posted: January 30, 2019.

Before departing this website, may we suggest that you visit Barakah’s Table of Contents for links to more than 140 pieces dedicated to Mawlana Hazar Imam and his family.

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More photos at https://the.ismaili/news/mawlana-hazar-imam-attends-opening-session-inaugural-paris-peace-forum

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This website, Barakah, is a special project by http://www.Simerg.com and is dedicated to the textual and visual celebration of His Highness the Aga Khan.

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